17,005 Documents in our Technical Library
2427865 Total Downloads

Newest Additions

NASA-RP-1060 Subsonic Aircraft: Evolution and the Matching of Size to Performance
NASA-RP-1060 Subsonic Aircraft: Evolution and the Matching of Size to Performance
AA-CP-20212-001
AA-CP-20212-001
ADPO10769 Occurrence of Corrosion in Airframes
The purpose of this lecture is to provide an overview ...
MIL-STD-1759 Rivets and Rivet Type Fasteners Preferred for Design
The purpose of this book form standard is to provide ...
MIL-STD-810G Environmental Engineering Considerations and Laboratory Tests
This standard contains materiel acquisition program planning and engineering direction ...

naca-tn-306

naca-tn-306
  • Version
  • 332 Downloads
  • 1.35 MB File Size
  • 1 File Count
  • May 3, 2016 Create Date
  • May 3, 2016 Last Updated
Scroll for Details

National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Technical Notes - Curves Showing Column Strength of Steel and Duralumin Tubing
naca-tn-306 Curves Showing Column Strength of Steel and Duralumin Tubing
The following set of column strength curves are intended
to simplify the method of determining the size of struts in an
airplane structure when the load in the member is known, and to
simplify the checking of the strength of a strut, knowing the
size and length.
In the past it has been customary to compute the size of a
strut by trial and error, with the use of the basic formulas,
or by the use of nomographic charts, which were conducive of
error because of the necessity for referring to tables to be
sure that the strut came within Johnson‘s or Euler's range.
With the following curves no computations are necessary,
as in the case of the old—fashioned method of strut design; no
straitedge is needed to connect points, as in the case of the
nomographic charts; no reference need be made to tables to as—
certain the limiting-length of a strut, as the curve for each
size strut is complete in itself through the range of long and
short columns. The process is so simple that draftsmen or oth~
ere who are not entirely familiar with mechanics can check the
strength of a strut without much danger of error. If it is de—
sirable to use the lightest tube available for the same strength
it can be seen at a glance which are the lighter, because the
tubes ascend the ordinate of zero length with increasing cross—
sectional area and hence greater weight. Therefore, if two or
more tubes give the same strength for a given length, the light—
est can'be determined because its curve will intersect the ordi—
nate of zero length in the lowest position. If a member (as in
the case of some fuselage members) is designed by tension, the
size can be determined from these charts if the yield point is
used as the allowable tensile strength. The tensile strength
is to be found on the ordinate of zero length.

FileAction
naca-tn-306 Curves Showing Column Strength of Steel and Duralumin Tubing.pdfDownload 

Comment On This Post

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

naca-tn-306

naca-tn-306
  • Version
  • 332 Downloads
  • 1.35 MB File Size
  • 1 File Count
  • May 3, 2016 Create Date
  • May 3, 2016 Last Updated
Scroll for Details

National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Technical Notes - Curves Showing Column Strength of Steel and Duralumin Tubing
naca-tn-306 Curves Showing Column Strength of Steel and Duralumin Tubing
The following set of column strength curves are intended
to simplify the method of determining the size of struts in an
airplane structure when the load in the member is known, and to
simplify the checking of the strength of a strut, knowing the
size and length.
In the past it has been customary to compute the size of a
strut by trial and error, with the use of the basic formulas,
or by the use of nomographic charts, which were conducive of
error because of the necessity for referring to tables to be
sure that the strut came within Johnson‘s or Euler's range.
With the following curves no computations are necessary,
as in the case of the old—fashioned method of strut design; no
straitedge is needed to connect points, as in the case of the
nomographic charts; no reference need be made to tables to as—
certain the limiting-length of a strut, as the curve for each
size strut is complete in itself through the range of long and
short columns. The process is so simple that draftsmen or oth~
ere who are not entirely familiar with mechanics can check the
strength of a strut without much danger of error. If it is de—
sirable to use the lightest tube available for the same strength
it can be seen at a glance which are the lighter, because the
tubes ascend the ordinate of zero length with increasing cross—
sectional area and hence greater weight. Therefore, if two or
more tubes give the same strength for a given length, the light—
est can'be determined because its curve will intersect the ordi—
nate of zero length in the lowest position. If a member (as in
the case of some fuselage members) is designed by tension, the
size can be determined from these charts if the yield point is
used as the allowable tensile strength. The tensile strength
is to be found on the ordinate of zero length.

FileAction
naca-tn-306 Curves Showing Column Strength of Steel and Duralumin Tubing.pdfDownload 
17,005 Documents in our Technical Library
2427865 Total Downloads

Search The Technical Library

Newest Additions

NASA-RP-1060 Subsonic Aircraft: Evolution and the Matching of Size to Performance
NASA-RP-1060 Subsonic Aircraft: Evolution and the Matching of Size to Performance
AA-CP-20212-001
AA-CP-20212-001
ADPO10769 Occurrence of Corrosion in Airframes
The purpose of this lecture is to provide an overview ...
MIL-STD-1759 Rivets and Rivet Type Fasteners Preferred for Design
The purpose of this book form standard is to provide ...
MIL-STD-810G Environmental Engineering Considerations and Laboratory Tests
This standard contains materiel acquisition program planning and engineering direction ...